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Bayou Dorcheat Pirogue # 2

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,807
49
Started another pirogue recently. I made a 1/2 scale model based on the dimensons of my last boat and some changes I wanted. After tweeking the model to the shape and dimensons I needed, I used those figures to cut out the sides and make two jigs. Placed the sides around the jigs and adjusted the shape. The chine logs were then attached to the sides.
IMG_5311.JPG


Before installing the floor I used Joey's tip and sanded the logs flush.
IMG_5314.JPG
 
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,807
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After attaching the bottom I attempted to make the tumblehome with a straight edge instead of following the curved lines of the sides. The traditional pirogues (ones that have tumblehome sides) that I have seen are straight and do not run all the way to the stems. I did not have suitable lumber to easily make them and decide not to.
IMG_5321.JPG
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,290
38
South Louisiana
Well, I recognize that build style! Ha! So, how does it compare to your style so far? The only thing that's a bit tough is making a really clean fit between the chines and the stems. Whether they butt up into each other below the stem piece or they butt to the stem piece, it's still a nice bit of fitting.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,807
49
This was not my first build using forms and pre cut sides. It did go better than the other time. It is probably easier than the "from the bottom up" way I usually do. Not sure it is as accurate. I missed my desired rocker by about 1/2" at the bow. I checked before fastening the floor but apparently measured wrong. A little more attention and experience on my part will help. I guess it can be accurate it just requires more trial and error to get what you want. It does make fitting the bottom to the chine logs easy and simple.
Installing the chine logs after the sides are bent around the forms was easier for me than putting them on the sides before bending. Cutting and fitting the ends of the logs this way was not much harder than when they are on the floor. I have found that fitting them together before installing the stem piece works best. The stem piece sitting on top of the chine logs will hide a not so perfect fit.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,290
38
South Louisiana
"..... The stem piece sitting on top of the chine logs will hide a not so perfect fit. ....." Now you're talking my game! LOL. To borrow one of your lines "What's 1/2" to a boat? " Ha!
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,807
49
After installing the plywood tumblehome panels they had warped(dipped) between the stems and supports due to the twisting. Not sure if these pictures show it well enough. I raised them up and then installed the combing. After removing the temporary supports the combing straightened the panels. When building "by hand and eye" you have to keep an eye on the work. Not sure if these pictures show this well enough.
IMG_5323.JPG
IMG_5324.JPG
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
550
22
79
Central Kansas and Central Texas
JD, thanks for posting It's real interesting to be able to adapt other people's techniques to our own boats. I had similar Tumble home problems with that ugly duckling boat. What is the approximate angle of the tumblehome to the sides in this boat? Thanks to you and Joey for helping me get out of the build by plans mode :)
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,807
49
The tumblehome panel is angled 98 deg. off the sides at midship (at the braces). That angle is determined by what depth/height you need the panel to reach and how wide the cockpit is. The twisting occurs because the sides become more vertical at the ends. They are also rising as the sides get taller.
I probably should add another support to each side and adjust the spacing. That may help the panel to resist twisting or at least not be as noticeable.
In the past when I used strips that were bead and cove to build the panels on the boat I did not have an issue. Without the bead and cove the strips wanted to separate. I now understand it was because of the twisting.
I wouldn't know what would happen if you made the panel and glassed it before installing.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,807
49
I'm pleased I was able to correct the "warped" tumblehome panel. Probably would have went unnoticed by most folks but it bothered me. The overall shape is enough different from my other boats that it looks a little "canoeish" to me, but the more I look the better I like it.
I don't have the written specs with me but I will correct myself latter if needed. It is kind of a XL version of your boat. Overall length 12'-4", Floor length 12', Max floor width 28" located 8" behind center, Max beam 34", Midship depth 10", Stem height 12". Has not been weighed.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,290
38
South Louisiana
I think for your use, you've got the design about right. I don't imagine you'll find any flaws in it's performance. It's hard to get by the physics of the thing. Longer boats paddle better, but are usually heavier, harder to carry and store and require more material. Shorter boats are more manuverable, lighter, easier to carry and store and require less material. It always comes down to a compromise.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
550
22
79
Central Kansas and Central Texas
Started another pirogue recently. I made a 1/2 scale model based on the dimensons of my last boat and some changes I wanted. After tweeking the model to the shape and dimensons I needed, I used those figures to cut out the sides and make two jigs. Placed the sides around the jigs and adjusted the shape. The chine logs were then attached to the sides.
View attachment 1642

Before installing the floor I used Joey's tip and sanded the logs flush.
View attachment 1643
Any chance of a picture of the form clamps? Looks like a good idea.

tr
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,807
49
I don't have access to my pictures right now. Look at this post https://www.southernpaddler.com/community/threads/truck-boat-2.10206/ . If the photobucket censorship effort is not too bad you may see enough to get the idea. If that doesn't work for you, I will try to text you a picture.
The clamps are basically are large tweezers made by ripping a 2" X 4" and cutting a slot to fit around the material to be clamped. I used old sanding belts to hinge the end. Leather or other material would probably work better. (I'm cheap.) Fancier designs have a carriage bolt and wing nut to apply the clamping pressure. I just use my ratchet clamp. I find it allows a deeper reach for the same length clamp.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,807
49
If I would stick with the same build procedures and design, my experience would matter more. That would be boring.