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How Often/How Long?

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,823
50
Thinking about all the factors that need to be considered in choosing a boat. How well a boat suits our needs and wants is determined by it's design and compromises.
Most discussions seem to consider capacity, weight, stability, and speed. What ever is your priority is, it will require a compromise/change in other areas.
I just realized how often and how long I use my boats has influenced my design choices and compromises. My post about rocker and trim is from the fact that I want to sit behind center of my boat. I want to have my gear in front of me and be able to sit with my legs stretched out. If I was only fishing for a couple hours I could compromise and shift myself and gear around to trim the boat. That would be uncomfortable for an all day trip.

Not as much in the past couple months but I sometimes have gone fishing/paddling a couple times a week, 5 to 8 hrs. each. How often I get to go has led me to seek shorter and lighter boats that are easier to load, carry, etc. Sitting for several hours has influenced chair design and the boat's stability and size. There is no perfect boat, but a fine tuned one can be had , one that is a joy to use.

How often and for how long do you use your boat? Has that influenced your choice?
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,429
113
78
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
I like to sit just back of the center line ( Balance point ) of the boat with my legs in front of it. This way the bow is slightly higher then the stern. Loading the weight is evenly distributed between the stern area and the bow. This leaves the center section for myself. I know that neither the bow will not dig into anything and the stern will not drag.
That lets me paddle all day long on one side having the boat responding the way I want it. Most of my paddling is in a canoe but it works the same with a pirogue. Kayaks no choice , it's a double paddle every time. My Canoe ( Sasquatch 14-30 ) from Jem Watercraft is 14 feet and handles great for river cruising and camping.
Open areas like the Everglades National Park ( 100 mile canoe trail ) I like one at 16 feet since you have to take a minimum of one gallon of water for each day out. 14 days = 14 gallons. ( roughly 112 pounds of extra weight). Plus all your food and camping gear. ( fishing also )
Same for the Okefenokee but shorter trip of 5 days.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,301
40
South Louisiana
I only use my pirogue once or twice a month lately. I normally go on 2 to 4 mile easy cruises with almost no added weight. If I fish, I'll have a lightweight fly fishing outfit, a few flies, a 3 lb anchor and a plastic bucket for the fish. Add a water bottle and it's less than 10 lbs. By about 10:00, I either have enough fish or enough of fishing. I may do a little camping and that might add another 30 lbs.

I build my boats to sit dead level........with any rocker evenly distributed front and rear. That puts my seat about a foot behind center. Double paddle ONLY for me. Since I switched to the double paddle, I've paddled maybe 300 yards with a standard paddle in over 1500 miles of paddling. I quickly learned why I changed!

My boats have gotten shorter and lighter. Old age, I guess.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,823
50
We made a fishing trip today with the two new pirogues. Probably an average trip for us. Fished and paddled for 6 hrs. and covered about 5 to 6 miles round trip.
When I move forward enough to get the nose down the little boat will scoot along. Not racing speeds but plenty adequate for our usage. The forward seating does restrict access to my rods but it is doable.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
553
22
79
Central Kansas and Central Texas
Thinking about all the factors that need to be considered in choosing a boat. How well a boat suits our needs and wants is determined by it's design and compromises.
Most discussions seem to consider capacity, weight, stability, and speed. What ever is your priority is, it will require a compromise/change in other areas.
I just realized how often and how long I use my boats has influenced my design choices and compromises. My post about rocker and trim is from the fact that I want to sit behind center of my boat. I want to have my gear in front of me and be able to sit with my legs stretched out. If I was only fishing for a couple hours I could compromise and shift myself and gear around to trim the boat. That would be uncomfortable for an all day trip.

Not as much in the past couple months but I sometimes have gone fishing/paddling a couple times a week, 5 to 8 hrs. each. How often I get to go has led me to seek shorter and lighter boats that are easier to load, carry, etc. Sitting for several hours has influenced chair design and the boat's stability and size. There is no perfect boat, but a fine tuned one can be had , one that is a joy to use.

How often and for how long do you use your boat? Has that influenced your choice?