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Grand Banks Dory

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,317
40
South Louisiana
I've been interested in learning more about the common dory. Many versions are out there, but the Grand Banks Dory seems to be the classic style. A typical one would be 19 1/2 feet long and 5 foot 7" max beam..........a pretty formidable boat. VERY stout construction. Bottoms were 1" to 1 and 1/4" thick. Sides and ribs were similarly stout. They normally had narrow, flat bottoms and 30-35 degree side flair. Beekeeper is right on the money with his preferred flair. I've read they are somewhat "tiddly" when empty........ which I took to mean a bit skittish. Keep in mind that they weren't supposed to stay empty long. They were there to catch a LOT of fish...........over 2-3000 lbs was common before going back to the mother ship to unload.

I would think making one for lightly-loaded recreational use, you would have to increase bottom width and narrow the max beam to increase the stabiliy. What you would be left with is a souped up pirogue. :D
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,856
52
Reduce the dory's size so it can be paddled instead of rowing, and it seems to me you have described a "marsh" pirogue. Increase the size of a pirogue to work in high seas and it could be described as a dory.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,317
40
South Louisiana
Aside from the paddling backwards thing, a dory would make a good all-around boat. Some of the modern ones have a motor well a foot or two from the stern and can accept up to 8 hp or so. They move right along with the traditional oars. You are using the power of both legs, both arms and your back. Mighty efficient and powerful.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,856
52
Aside from the paddling backwards thing, a dory would make a good all-around boat. ................... They move right along with the traditional oars. You are using the power of both legs, both arms and your back. Mighty efficient and powerful.
Add a "joug" for the oars and it would become a creole skiff and then you could row forward to see where you are going. Another form of this boat is the river drift boats. They are used on very swift and rough rivers.
I think these up scaled pirogues show that a flat bottom and straight sided boat can be made stable.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,450
117
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
When I was a kid I had a old Courtney wood boat. It was made from cypress and had a attached set of oar locks. Two oars were the propulsion system for it. I sat on the middle seat when rowing it. My was of doing t was....I would pick where I wanted to go then 180 degrees from that find a land mark. When rowing I would keep that land mark centered over the stern of the boat. I would eventually end up exactly where I wanted to be. Worked great for open water lakes but stunk for paddling creeks . :rolleyes:
Later Dad got me a old 7 1/2 Martin Motor for the boat. It was unique in one way. When storing it in stead of lifting the lower unit out of the water and leaving it that way. I could release a lever and swing the lower unit into the boat with the power head out over the stern. Dad had a 20 H.P. Martin on his ski boat. ( This was back in the middle to late 50's )

The 7.5.
 
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oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
570
25
79
Central Kansas and Central Texas
When I was a kid I had a old Courtney wood boat. It was made from cypress and had a attached set of oar locks. Two oars were the propulsion system for it. I sat on the middle seat when rowing it. My was of doing t was....I would pick where I wanted to go then 180 degrees from that find a land mark. When rowing I would keep that land mark centered over the stern of the boat. I would eventually end up exactly where I wanted to be. Worked great for open water lakes but stunk for paddling creeks . :rolleyes:
Later Dad got me a old 7 1/2 Martin Motor for the boat. It was unique in one way. When storing it in stead of lifting the lower unit out of the water and leaving it that way. I could release a lever and swing the lower unit into the boat with the power head out over the stern. Dad had a 20 H.P. Martin on his ski boat. ( This was back in the middle to late 50's )

The 7.5.
Thanks for posting real interesing I solved rowing in the Creek's problem by setting on the back seat instead of the middle seat and pushing on the oars. Was easier to fish with my cane Pole!
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,450
117
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
The rear seat for rowing when going down stream is ideal when fishing. No matter what folks say I will always think that a trolling motor spooks the educated fish and rowing or paddling sneaks up on them.
I have been on bridges ( with clean water below ) and watched the action of fish. A trolling motor come's along and they scatter before the boat arrives. A paddler comes along and when they see the boat the drift over to one side or the other.